Cognitive-Linguistic Demands and Speech Breathing This investigation examined the influence of cognitive-linguistic processing demands on speech breathing. Twenty women were studied during performance of two speaking tasks that were designed to differ in cognitive-linguistic planning requirements. Speech breathing was monitored with respiratory magnetometers from which recordings were made of the anteroposterior diameter changes of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1996
Cognitive-Linguistic Demands and Speech Breathing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather L. Mitchell
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Peter J. Watson
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Contact author: Jeannette D. Hoit, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. E-mail: jenjen@cnet.shs.arizona.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1996
Cognitive-Linguistic Demands and Speech Breathing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 93-104. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.93
History: Received February 3, 1995 , Accepted July 3, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 93-104. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.93
History: Received February 3, 1995; Accepted July 3, 1995

This investigation examined the influence of cognitive-linguistic processing demands on speech breathing. Twenty women were studied during performance of two speaking tasks that were designed to differ in cognitive-linguistic planning requirements. Speech breathing was monitored with respiratory magnetometers from which recordings were made of the anteroposterior diameter changes of the rib cage and abdomen. Results indicated that speech breathing was similar across speaking conditions with respect to nearly all measures of lung volume, rib cage volume, and abdomen volume. Task-related differences were found for certain fluency-related measures. Specifically, the number of syllables produced per breath group was smaller, average speaking rate was slower, and average lung volume expended per syllable was greater under a higher cognitive-linguistic demand condition than under a lower-demand condition. These differences were explained by the fact that silent pauses, particularly those associated with expiration, were more prevalent and longer in duration under the higher-demand condition. It appears that the mechanical behavior of the breathing apparatus during speaking generally is unaffected by variations in cognitive-linguistic demands of the type investigated; however, fluency-related breathing behavior appears to be highly sensitive to such demands.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by Clinical Investigator Development Award DC-00030 and National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors gratefully acknowledge the helpful comments of Merrill F. Garrett, Anthony B. DeFeo, and Carol A. Boliek on an earlier draft of this manuscript and the assistance of E. Fiona Bailey, Cynthia L. Johnson, and Christie L. Jenks. The authors also appreciate the thoughtful suggestions offered by the Associate Editor, Elaine T. Stathopoulos, and three anonymous reviewers.
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