Older Adult Performance on the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired The Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) (Demorest & Erdman, 1986) is a self-assessment inventory that was developed on a clinical population that included predominantly male, active-duty military personnel. They spanned a 50-year age range (M = 39.5 years) and typically demonstrated bilateral, noise-induced, high-frequency, sensorineural hearing loss. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1996
Older Adult Performance on the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dean C. Garstecki
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Susan F. Erler
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Dean C. Garstecki, PhD, Audiology and Hearing Sciences Program, Northwestern University, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3550. E-mail: dcg679@nwu.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1996
Older Adult Performance on the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 28-42. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.28
History: Received October 15, 1994 , Accepted September 28, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 28-42. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.28
History: Received October 15, 1994; Accepted September 28, 1995

The Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) (Demorest & Erdman, 1986) is a self-assessment inventory that was developed on a clinical population that included predominantly male, active-duty military personnel. They spanned a 50-year age range (M = 39.5 years) and typically demonstrated bilateral, noise-induced, high-frequency, sensorineural hearing loss. The present study examined CPHI data obtained from approximately equal numbers of advantaged older men and women (M = 75 years) with acquired, mild-moderate, sensorineural hearing loss. Mean, standard deviation, t-test, omega-squared statistics, response frequency distribution, and skewness data are reported. Comparisons of hearing handicap in older adults and generally younger members of the military group are highlighted. Performance differences potentially related to age, personality, lifestyle, and other factors are identified. Results describe the older adult’s approach to self-management of hearing loss and associated communication problems. Clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from The Retirement Research Foundation. Consultants to this project included William Davis, Cheryl Longinotti, and Steven Zecker. The authors are grateful to Nic Parodi for technical assistance with computer files.
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