Children's Analysis of Derivational Suffix Meanings This note examined the relation between school-age children's production and comprehension of derivational suffixes in nonsense words and their knowledge of suffix meaning in real derivatives. Results indicated that knowledge of derivational suffixes was used often in defining low-frequency derivatives and that it was significantly correlated with suffix production in ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 1996
Children's Analysis of Derivational Suffix Meanings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Debra J. Lewis
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Jennifer Windsor
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Jennifer Windsor, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    Contact author: Jennifer Windsor, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   February 01, 1996
Children's Analysis of Derivational Suffix Meanings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 209-216. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.209
History: Received September 19, 1994 , Accepted May 22, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 209-216. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.209
History: Received September 19, 1994; Accepted May 22, 1995

This note examined the relation between school-age children's production and comprehension of derivational suffixes in nonsense words and their knowledge of suffix meaning in real derivatives. Results indicated that knowledge of derivational suffixes was used often in defining low-frequency derivatives and that it was significantly correlated with suffix production in the nonsense task. In addition, suffix productivity was found to be an important factor determining the comprehension as well as the production of particular suffixes to convey a range of meanings.

Acknowledgments
Thanks are extended to Paul Lewis for creating the stimulus materials, to Kathleen Niznick for protocol administration, to Mina Hwang for reliability checking, and to the students at Epiphany School, Coon Rapids, Minnesota, for their participation. Thanks are extended also to Robert Schlauch for his input, and to Patricia Broen and Joseph Stemberger for their comments on an earlier version of the paper. This article is based on research conducted by the first author, under direction of the second author, in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Master of Arts degree at the University of Minnesota. The research was supported by a grant to the second author from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R29-DC02402-02) and by an award from the Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Research Fund at the University of Minnesota.
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