Mother Child Synchrony and Communicative Reciprocity in Late-Talking Toddlers Eighteen mother-child dyads that included 24- to 31-month-old boys who were late talkers were compared in terms of social cues and dyadic synchrony with dyads including normally developing boys matched with the other boys in terms of SES and nonverbal ability. Mothers of late talkers did not differ from comparison ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1996
Mother Child Synchrony and Communicative Reciprocity in Late-Talking Toddlers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leslie Rescorla
    Bryn Mawr College Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Terri Fechnay
    Bryn Mawr College Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Contact author: Leslie Rescorla, PhD, Department of Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 101 N. Merion Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010. E-mail: Irescorl@cc.brynmawr.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1996
Mother Child Synchrony and Communicative Reciprocity in Late-Talking Toddlers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 200-208. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.200
History: Received November 20, 1994 , Accepted July 31, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 200-208. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.200
History: Received November 20, 1994; Accepted July 31, 1995

Eighteen mother-child dyads that included 24- to 31-month-old boys who were late talkers were compared in terms of social cues and dyadic synchrony with dyads including normally developing boys matched with the other boys in terms of SES and nonverbal ability. Mothers of late talkers did not differ from comparison group mothers in degree of synchrony with their children nor in their use of social cues. Similarly, late talkers did not differ from comparison children in play synchrony, compliance, or overall communicativeness, although they made significantly fewer clear verbalizations, produced significantly more unintelligible utterances, and relied more heavily on gestural and nonverbal communicative cues. Dyads with late talkers manifested stronger patterns of relationship between the variables studied than comparison dyads, with highly controlling mothers tending to be low in synchrony and to have children who were low in both compliance and synchrony.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants to the first author from the Bryn Mawr College Faculty Research Fund and from the National Institutes of Health (NICHD Area Grant 1-R15-HD22355-01; NIDCD R01-DC00807). This paper is based on a doctoral dissertation submitted by Terri Fechnay to Bryn Mawr College. Portions of the paper were presented at the 17th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, October 1992. The authors wish to thank Dr. Sandy Williams, who served as the second transcriber and coder for this research; Katherme Dahlsgaard, who assisted in data analysis; and the mothers and children we studied, who made the research possible.
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