A Comparison of Conflict Tactics in the Supervisory Process This study investigated three different tactics clinical supervisors in communication disorders predicted they would use in a specific conflict situation. One hundred-sixty supervisors were asked to read one of three case scenarios describing a conflict situation within the supervisory process. All scenarios depicted a student-clinician who had not completed a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1996
A Comparison of Conflict Tactics in the Supervisory Process
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicki McCready
    Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Joanne Erwick Roberts
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Deborah Bengala
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Holly Harris
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Georgia Kingsley
    Developmental Evaluation Center Greensboro, NC
  • Carol Krikorian
    Guilford County Public Schools Greensboro, NC
  • Contact author: Vicki McCready, MA, Director, Speech and Hearing Center, 300 Ferguson Building, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27412
    Contact author: Vicki McCready, MA, Director, Speech and Hearing Center, 300 Ferguson Building, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27412×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1996
A Comparison of Conflict Tactics in the Supervisory Process
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 191-199. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.191
History: Received April 4, 1994 , Accepted June 5, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 191-199. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.191
History: Received April 4, 1994; Accepted June 5, 1995

This study investigated three different tactics clinical supervisors in communication disorders predicted they would use in a specific conflict situation. One hundred-sixty supervisors were asked to read one of three case scenarios describing a conflict situation within the supervisory process. All scenarios depicted a student-clinician who had not completed a reading assignment requested by the supervisor. The scenarios differed only in the supervisee’s response to the supervisor’s question about the incomplete assignment. Subjects were asked to indicate how likely they might be to use each of 15 comments that reflected categories of conflict tactics: avoidance, competitive, or collaborative tactics. Supervisors’ choice of tactics differed depending on the response of the supervisee. Overall, supervisors most often chose collaborative responses, followed by avoidance responses and (least often) competitive responses. Implications are discussed in terms of impact on the supervisory process in communication disorders.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the North Carolina Association of Supervisors in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (NCASSPA). The authors were on a Research Committee of NCASSPA and want to thank all the NCASSPA members and supervisors in North Carolina who participated in the study and/or who assisted in data colletion. We also appreciate the assistance of Diane Gardner and Jody Natalie in the beginning stages of the project and of Elizabeth Gunn and Margaret Burchinal from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center in the data analysis. For their helpful commentary on the manuscript we thank Jacqueline Cimorelli, MacGregor Frank, Ginger Hinton, Jody Natalie, Mariana Newton, Marisue Pickering, and David Shapiro. We also appreciate the work of Connie Prater, Courtney Kilpatrick, and Kristin Vaughan in the preparation of the manuscript. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 1992 ASHA Convention in San Antonio.
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