Interjudge Agreement in Videofluoroscopic Studies of Swallowing Videofluoroscopic swallowing examinations of 3 patients with dysphagia were reviewed independently by 10 speech-language pathologists. Prior to viewing each video, clinicians were provided with information about the patient's history, the results of a bedside swallow examination, and oral-facial and oral motor control examinations. Clinicians completed a swallowing observation protocol as ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 1996
Interjudge Agreement in Videofluoroscopic Studies of Swallowing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Felicia Wilcox
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Julie M. Liss
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Gerald M. Siegel
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Currently affiliated with United Hospital, St. Paul, MN.
    Currently affiliated with United Hospital, St. Paul, MN.×
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe.
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe.×
  • Contact author: Julie Liss, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Box 871908, Tempe, AZ 85281.
    Contact author: Julie Liss, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Box 871908, Tempe, AZ 85281.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   February 01, 1996
Interjudge Agreement in Videofluoroscopic Studies of Swallowing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 144-152. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.144
History: Received January 17, 1995 , Accepted May 8, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1996, Vol. 39, 144-152. doi:10.1044/jshr.3901.144
History: Received January 17, 1995; Accepted May 8, 1995

Videofluoroscopic swallowing examinations of 3 patients with dysphagia were reviewed independently by 10 speech-language pathologists. Prior to viewing each video, clinicians were provided with information about the patient's history, the results of a bedside swallow examination, and oral-facial and oral motor control examinations. Clinicians completed a swallowing observation protocol as they viewed each video. They then recommended, from a list of treatment strategies, intervention techniques that would be most appropriate for each patient. Interjudge agreement was calculated by determining how many clinicians observed a given swallowing event or deficit, and how many recommended a given treatment strategy. Results suggest that the level of interjudge agreement for videofluoroscopic evaluations is not encouragingly high.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on an MA thesis completed by F. Wilcox at the University of Minnesota. Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Bryngelson Fund, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota. We gratefully acknowledge Robert Brookshire, Don MacLennan, Jim Schumacher, and Meredith Gerdin for their help in gathering the patient data for this investigation.
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