Recognition of Gated Words by Children With Specific Language Impairment An Examination of Lexical Mapping Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1999
Recognition of Gated Words by Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James W. Montgomery
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: James W. Montgomery, PhD, Wing D, CB# 7190, Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7255.
    Contact author: James W. Montgomery, PhD, Wing D, CB# 7190, Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7255.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jmontgomery@css.unc.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1999
Recognition of Gated Words by Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 735-743. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.735
History: Received July 29, 1998 , Accepted December 17, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 735-743. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.735
History: Received July 29, 1998; Accepted December 17, 1998

In this study we examined the lexical mapping stage of auditory word recognition in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Twenty-one children with SLI, 21 children matched for chronological age (CM), and 21 vocabulary-matched (VM) children participated in a forward gating task in which they listened to successive temporal chunks of familiar monosyllabic nouns. After each gate, children guessed the identity of the word and provided a confidence rating of their word guess. Results revealed that the children with SLI performed comparably to the CM and VM children on all seven dependent measures related to lexical mapping. The findings were interpreted to suggest that children with SLI and their normally developing peers demonstrate a comparable lexical mapping phase (i.e., acoustic-phonetic analysis) of auditory word recognition.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Research Grant R29 DC 02535 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. We express our gratitude to the many children and their parents who participated in this study. The helpful comments of three anonymous reviewers and Karla McGregor are also greatly appreciated. Some of the findings of this study were reported at the annual convention of the Hearing Association, Boston, 1997.
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