Grammatical Morphology and the Lexicon in Children With Specific Language Impairment We examined the use of grammatical morphology by preschool-age English-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) as a function of their lexical diversity. Relative to a group of normally developing (ND) preschoolers, these children's use of finite-verb morphology lagged behind expectations based on the number of different verbs they used. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1999
Grammatical Morphology and the Lexicon in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Carol Miller
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Erika Gerber
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: xdxl@purdue.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1999
Grammatical Morphology and the Lexicon in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 678-689. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.678
History: Received April 14, 1998 , Accepted October 1, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 678-689. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.678
History: Received April 14, 1998; Accepted October 1, 1998

We examined the use of grammatical morphology by preschool-age English-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) as a function of their lexical diversity. Relative to a group of normally developing (ND) preschoolers, these children's use of finite-verb morphology lagged behind expectations based on the number of different verbs they used. Noun-related morphology fell below expectations based on overall lexical diversity. Differences between the ND children and children with SLI were also seen for the slope of the increases in finite-verb morphology as a function of lexical diversity, with shallower slopes in the SLI data. The findings of this study add to existing evidence suggesting that a measure of finite grammatical-morphology use has promise as a clinical marker of SLI in English.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was supported by Research Grant 5 R01 DC 00-458 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The authors thank Joellen Stanton and Kendra Thorpe for their assistance on this project, and Lisa Goffman for her helpful comments on an earlier draft of this paper.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access