Application of the Correct Information Unit Analysis to the Naturally Occurring Conversation of a Person With Aphasia The Correct Information Unit (CIU) analysis for measuring the communicative informativeness and efficiency of connected speech (Nicholas & Brookshire, 1993) was applied to the naturally occurring conversation of a person with moderate aphasia. Results indicated that, in this instance, reliable CIU measures could not be obtained. Intrarater reliability for CIU ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1999
Application of the Correct Information Unit Analysis to the Naturally Occurring Conversation of a Person With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary L. Oelschlaeger
    University of New Mexico Albuquerque
  • John C. Thorne
    University of New Mexico Albuquerque
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mary.oelschlaeger@nua.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff
    Currently affiliated with Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff×
  • Currently affiliated with Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM
    Currently affiliated with Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1999
Application of the Correct Information Unit Analysis to the Naturally Occurring Conversation of a Person With Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 636-648. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.636
History: Received January 1, 1998 , Accepted August 25, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 636-648. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.636
History: Received January 1, 1998; Accepted August 25, 1998

The Correct Information Unit (CIU) analysis for measuring the communicative informativeness and efficiency of connected speech (Nicholas & Brookshire, 1993) was applied to the naturally occurring conversation of a person with moderate aphasia. Results indicated that, in this instance, reliable CIU measures could not be obtained. Intrarater reliability for CIU and %CIU was low, reaching only 72%, and interrater reliability was never greater than 63%. However, reliability of word counts was good. Post hoc analysis of rater disagreements in application of the CIU analysis revealed that the majority (72%) resulted from insufficiencies in the scoring rules that were originally designed to measure single speaker connected discourse. Two descriptive categories of disagreements were identified: interpretations of informativeness and absence of rules. The remaining 28% of disagreements were attributable to human error in the application of scoring rules. Comparison of findings with previous research and implications for future research are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was conducted as a master’s thesis by the second author that was directed by the first author. We would like to express our appreciation to Bob Brookshire, Bob Marshall, and Associate Editor Shari Baum for their objectivity in reviewing this work and for their meaningful comments.
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