Response to Warren (1999) Dr. Warren describes a standard procedure for studying a physiological regulating system, namely that of introducing an error and then measuring the response to determine whether it represents a corrective compensation. Our study examined responses to the manipulation of a variable without considering them to be corrections or compensations—that ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   June 01, 1999
Response to Warren (1999)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher Dromey
    The Toronto Hospital The University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Lorraine Ramig
    The University of Colorado Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center Boulder
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   June 01, 1999
Response to Warren (1999)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 620. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.620
History: Received October 19, 1998 , Accepted November 30, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 620. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.620
History: Received October 19, 1998; Accepted November 30, 1998
Dr. Warren describes a standard procedure for studying a physiological regulating system, namely that of introducing an error and then measuring the response to determine whether it represents a corrective compensation. Our study examined responses to the manipulation of a variable without considering them to be corrections or compensations—that is, changes in lung volume were not seen as errors. Instead, the dependent variables were viewed as activity co-occurring with lung volume changes, and may not necessarily have been goal directed.
In his letter, Dr. Warren questions whether the displacement of the lips in the target syllable would be “meaningful in terms of articulatory compensations,” since intraoral air pressure would be very low with the lips parted. Had we been looking for compensation for introduced errors, we agree that there would have been little rationale for examining articulatory displacements in the context we chose. However, given that higher lung volumes are often associated with intentionally louder speech (Russell & Stathopoulos, 1988), and that increased lip displacements also accompany deliberately loud speech (Schulman, 1989), we chose to examine lip displacements in this context to learn whether speech that could become louder as a consequence of potentially elevated recoil pressures would also involve larger lip movements.
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