Can a Model of Overlapping Gestures Account for Scanning Speech Patterns? A simple acoustic model of overlapping, sliding gestures was used to evaluate whether coproduction was reduced for neurologic speakers with scanning speech patterns. F2 onset frequency was used as an acoustic measure of coproduction or gesture overlap. The effects of speaking rate (habitual versus fast) and utterance position (initial versus ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1999
Can a Model of Overlapping Gestures Account for Scanning Speech Patterns?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kris Tjaden
    Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Contact author: Kris Tjaden, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences, The State University of New York at Buffalo, 114 Cary, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214-3005.
    Contact author: Kris Tjaden, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences, The State University of New York at Buffalo, 114 Cary, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214-3005.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tjaden@acsu.buffalo.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1999
Can a Model of Overlapping Gestures Account for Scanning Speech Patterns?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 604-617. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.604
History: Received February 23, 1998 , Accepted January 20, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1999, Vol. 42, 604-617. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4203.604
History: Received February 23, 1998; Accepted January 20, 1999

A simple acoustic model of overlapping, sliding gestures was used to evaluate whether coproduction was reduced for neurologic speakers with scanning speech patterns. F2 onset frequency was used as an acoustic measure of coproduction or gesture overlap. The effects of speaking rate (habitual versus fast) and utterance position (initial versus medial) on F2 frequency, and presumably gesture overlap, were examined. Regression analyses also were used to evaluate the extent to which across-repetition temporal variability in F2 trajectories could be explained as variation in coproduction for consonants and vowels. The lower F2 onset frequencies for disordered speakers suggested that gesture overlap was reduced for neurologic individuals with scanning speech. Speaking rate change did not influence F2 onset frequencies, and presumably gesture overlap, for healthy or disordered speakers. F2 onset frequency differences for utterance-initial and -medial repetitions were interpreted to suggest reduced coproduction for the utterance-initial position. The utterance-position effects on F2 onset frequency, however, likely were complicated by position-related differences in articulatory scaling. The results of the regression analysis indicated that gesture sliding accounts, in part, for temporal variability in F2 trajectories. Taken together, the results of this study provide support for the idea that speech production theory for healthy talkers helps to account for disordered speech production.

Acknowledgments
A portion of this study was presented at the December 1996 Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the Japanese Acoustical Society. I would like to thank Michael Cannito, Julie Liss, and Gary Weismer for comments on earlier versions of the manuscript.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access