A Comparison of Learning Curves in Natural and Synthesized Speech Comprehension This study examined the effect of listening practice on the ability of young adults to comprehend natural speech and DECtalk synthesized speech by having them perform a sentence verification task over a 5-day period. Results showed that response latencies of participants shortened in a similar fashion to sentences presented in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
A Comparison of Learning Curves in Natural and Synthesized Speech Comprehension
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary E. Reynolds, PhD
    Marshall University Huntington, WV
  • Charlene Isaacs-Duvall
    Marshall University Huntington, WV
  • Michelle Lynn Haddox
    Marshall University Huntington, WV
  • Contact author: Mary E. Reynolds, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, Marshall University, 400 Hal Greer Blvd., Huntington, WV 25755-2675. E-mail: reynoldm@marshall.edu
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
A Comparison of Learning Curves in Natural and Synthesized Speech Comprehension
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 802-810. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/065)
History: Received July 11, 2001 , Accepted February 28, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 802-810. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/065)
History: Received July 11, 2001; Accepted February 28, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

This study examined the effect of listening practice on the ability of young adults to comprehend natural speech and DECtalk synthesized speech by having them perform a sentence verification task over a 5-day period. Results showed that response latencies of participants shortened in a similar fashion to sentences presented in both types of speech across the 5-day period, with latencies remaining significantly longer in response to DECtalk than to natural speech across the days. These results suggest that high-quality synthesized speech, such as DECtalk, can be useful in many human factors applications.

Acknowledgments
This study was conducted with the help of an internal grant awarded to the first author by Marshall University. The authors gratefully acknowledge the students who participated in this study. Thanks are also due to Ed Fields of Audiotrax for producing the compact discs and to Jenny Givens for help in recruiting participants.
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