Picture Naming in Early Sequential Bilinguals A 1-Year Follow-Up Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
Picture Naming in Early Sequential Bilinguals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Kohnert, PhD
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Kathryn Kohnert, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Dr., SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: kohne005@umn.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
Picture Naming in Early Sequential Bilinguals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 759-771. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/061)
History: Received July 9, 2001 , Accepted April 2, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 759-771. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/061)
History: Received July 9, 2001; Accepted April 2, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 32

In a previous study, a cross-sectional approach was used to investigate developmental changes in basic-level lexical production and cognitive processing in early sequential bilinguals, exploring the effects of age and years of experience during single-language (Spanish or English) and mixed-language (alternating between Spanish and English) picture naming (K. Kohnert, E. Bates, & A. E. Hernandez, 1999). The current study reports on the performance, 1 year later, of a subgroup of these original study participants (n=28; mean age=10.2 years) on the same experimental task. Overall, from Time 1 to Time 2 testing, gains were greater in English than in Spanish and in the high-competition mixed-language processing condition than in the single-language processing condition. These results reinforce previous findings of a shift toward greater strength in L2 with increasing age (and years of language experience), as well as the primary role of cognitive development in control of the dual-language system. In addition, examination of individual performance revealed a complex non-monotonic pattern of L1–L2 change across time within an overall pattern of increasing speed, accuracy, and control of the dual-lexical system.

Acknowledgments
This research was presented, in part, as a poster at the 2001 Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders in Madison, WI. Support for this research came from a training grant from the Center for Research in Language at the University of California, San Diego, and from the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. I thank Eloisa Falcon and Eugenia Gurrola for their assistance with data collection. I am grateful to Jennifer Windsor for helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access