Production Operations and the Use of Nonfinite Verbs by Children With Specific Language Impairment Recent evidence from structural priming studies suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) are more likely to produce verb morphemes such as auxiliary is when their previous sentence contained an auxiliary than when it did not. The same paradigm was employed in the present study to determine whether failures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
Production Operations and the Use of Nonfinite Verbs by Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurence B. Leonard, PhD
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Carol A. Miller
    Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Patricia Deevy
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Leila Rauf
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Erika Gerber
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Monique Charest
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Laurence B. Leonard, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: xdxl@purdue.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
Production Operations and the Use of Nonfinite Verbs by Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 744-758. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/060)
History: Received June 18, 2001 , Accepted March 25, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 744-758. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/060)
History: Received June 18, 2001; Accepted March 25, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 31

Recent evidence from structural priming studies suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) are more likely to produce verb morphemes such as auxiliary is when their previous sentence contained an auxiliary than when it did not. The same paradigm was employed in the present study to determine whether failures to include auxiliary is might be due to prior use of nonfinite sentences (e.g., The mouse eating the cheese). Preschoolers with SLI and a group of younger normally developing children were more likely to produce auxiliary is to describe target pictures when the preceding sentence contained auxiliary are than when it contained past tense. Use of is in the target sentence was least likely when the preceding sentence was nonfinite. The implications of these findings for current accounts of SLI and current models of sentence production are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was supported by research grant R01 00-458 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors would like to thank the children and families who participated, and Amanda Burke, Kelly Dick, Katharine Graf, Bernard Grela, Kim Heminger, Robert Kurtz, Amanda Owen, Elgustus Polite, Natalie Kanaby, and Joellen Stanton for their assistance during various phases of the project.
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