Responding to Joint Attention and Language Development A Comparison of Target Locations Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
Responding to Joint Attention and Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine E. F. Delgado, PhD
    University of Miami Coral Gables, FL
  • Peter Mundy
    University of Miami Coral Gables, FL
  • Mary Crowson
    University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • Jessica Markus
    University of Miami Coral Gables, FL
  • Marygrace Yale
    University of Miami Coral Gables, FL
  • Heidi Schwartz
    University of Miami Coral Gables, FL
  • Contact author: Christine Delgado, PhD, University of Miami, PO Box 249229, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0721. E-mail: cdelgado@umiami.edu
Article Information
Development / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
Responding to Joint Attention and Language Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 715-719. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/057)
History: Received July 9, 2001 , Accepted February 26, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 715-719. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/057)
History: Received July 9, 2001; Accepted February 26, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

This study examined the importance of target location (within vs. outside the visual field) on the relation between responding to joint attention and subsequent language development in 47 normally developing infants. The results supported a developmental progression in the infants' ability to locate targets from within to outside the visual field. In addition, individual differences in 15-month-old infants' ability to correctly locate targets outside the visual field was a unique predictor of expressive language at 24 months. Infants' ability to locate targets outside the visual field may demonstrate increasing capacities for attention regulation, representational thinking, and social cognition that may facilitate language learning. The implications of this study are discussed with regard to the usefulness of measures of responding to joint attention for identifying early language and developmental delays.

Acknowledgments
This study was part of a program of research supported by a grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC00484). The authors would like to thank the families involved in this project for their gracious participation.
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