Self-Esteem in Children With Specific Language Impairment The purpose of this preliminary study was to probe the self-perceptions of a group of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their typically developing peers. A measure of self-esteem was administered to 46 children between the ages of 6 and 9 years old and 34 children between the ages ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
Self-Esteem in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Annette C. Jerome
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki, PhD
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Shane L. James
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Martin Fujiki, PhD, Brigham Young University, Department of Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT. E-mail: martin_fujiki@byu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
Self-Esteem in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 700-714. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/056)
History: Received June 1, 2001 , Accepted January 29, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 700-714. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/056)
History: Received June 1, 2001; Accepted January 29, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 61

The purpose of this preliminary study was to probe the self-perceptions of a group of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their typically developing peers. A measure of self-esteem was administered to 46 children between the ages of 6 and 9 years old and 34 children between the ages 10 and 13. In the younger group, there were no statistically significant differences between children with SLI and typically developing children in the way they perceived themselves across domains of competence and acceptance. In the older group, children with SLI perceived themselves more negatively in scholastic competence, social acceptance, and behavioral conduct than did children with typical language development. Differences were evident in areas that were most affected by language impairment.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We would like to thank Ms. Becky Almerico, Mr. Allen Gurney, Ms. Jean Gunn, Ms. Lisa Higbee, Ms. Janet Howe, Ms. Kristi Kitchen, Ms. Emily Larsen, Ms. Michele Lundell, Ms. Elizabeth Nealson, Ms. Kris Oleson, Ms. Ginger Pierce, Ms. Debbie Taggart, and Ms. Kristine Tanner for their assistance in participant identification. Finally, we would like to acknowledge Ms. Shelley Burton and Ms. Diane Clarke who assisted in data collection and analysis.
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