Coarticulation and Formant Transition Rate in Young Children Who Stutter The purpose of this study was to assess anticipatory coarticulation and second formant (F2) transition rate (FTR) of speech production in young children who stutter (CWS) and who do not stutter (CWNS). Fourteen CWS and 14 age- and gender-matched CWNS in three age groups (3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds) participated in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
Coarticulation and Formant Transition Rate in Young Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Soo-Eun Chang
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nashville, TN
  • Ralph N. Ohde, PhD
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nashville, TN
  • Edward G. Conture
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Ralph N. Ohde, PhD, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, 1114 19th Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212. E-mail: ohdexxrn@ctrvax.vanderbilt.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
Coarticulation and Formant Transition Rate in Young Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 676-688. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/054)
History: Received September 21, 2001 , Accepted April 4, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2002, Vol. 45, 676-688. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/054)
History: Received September 21, 2001; Accepted April 4, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

The purpose of this study was to assess anticipatory coarticulation and second formant (F2) transition rate (FTR) of speech production in young children who stutter (CWS) and who do not stutter (CWNS). Fourteen CWS and 14 age- and gender-matched CWNS in three age groups (3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds) participated in a picture-naming task that elicited single-word utterances. The initial consonant-vowel (CV) syllables of these utterances, comprising either bilabial [b m] or alveolar [d n s z] consonants and a number of vowels [i I e ε æ u o @αI α@], were used for acoustic analysis. To assess coarticulation and speech movement velocity, the F2 onset frequency and F2 vowel target frequency (for coarticulation) and FTR (for speech movement velocity) were computed for each CV syllable and for each participant. Based on these measures, locus equation statistics of slope, y-intercept, and standard error of estimate as well as the FTR were analyzed. Findings revealed a significant main effect for place of articulation and a significantly larger difference in FTR between the two places of articulation for CWNS than for CWS. Findings suggest that the organization of the FTR production for place of articulation may not be as contrastive or refined in CWS as in CWNS, a subtle difficulty in the speed of speech-language production, which may contribute to the disruption of their speech fluency.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH Grant DC00523-08. The article is based on a master's thesis completed at Vanderbilt University in 1999 by the first author under the direction of the second and third authors. The authors express their appreciation to Dan Ashmead for comments on earlier drafts of this paper and for his assistance on statistical analyses. We extend our most sincere thanks to the many children and their parents who participated in this research, without whose cooperation, help, and patience this study could not have been completed.
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