Visual Word Recognition in Two Facial Motion Conditions: Full-Face Versus Lips-Plus-Mandible The present study used a new method to develop video sequences that limited exposure of facial movement. A repeated-measures design was used to investigate the visual recognition of 60 monosyllabic spoken words, presented in an open set format, for two face exposure conditions (full-face vs. lips-plus-mandible). Twenty-six normal hearing college ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Visual Word Recognition in Two Facial Motion Conditions: Full-Face Versus Lips-Plus-Mandible
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn K. Marassa
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Charissa R. Lansing
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: Charissa R. Lansing, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, 901 South Sixth Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: crl@uiuc.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Robeson Elementary School, Champaign, IL
    Currently affiliated with Robeson Elementary School, Champaign, IL×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Visual Word Recognition in Two Facial Motion Conditions: Full-Face Versus Lips-Plus-Mandible
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1387-1394. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1387
History: Received September 5, 1994 , Accepted July 17, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1387-1394. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1387
History: Received September 5, 1994; Accepted July 17, 1995

The present study used a new method to develop video sequences that limited exposure of facial movement. A repeated-measures design was used to investigate the visual recognition of 60 monosyllabic spoken words, presented in an open set format, for two face exposure conditions (full-face vs. lips-plus-mandible). Twenty-six normal hearing college students and 4 adults with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss speechread a video laserdisc presentation of a male talker under the two face exposure conditions. Percent phoneme correct scores were similar in the part-face and full-face conditions. However, scores significantly improved for the repeated measure independent of the face exposure condition observed. The results suggested that speechreaders (a) can recognize monosyllabic words in video sequences that provide information only about movements of the lips-plus-mandible region and (b) are sensitive to practice effects.

Acknowledgments
This manuscript is based on Lynn K. Marassa’s thesis, supervised by Charissa R. Lansing and submitted in partial fulfillment for the degree of Master of Arts in Speech and Hearing Science. We appreciate the suggestions of the MA committee members, Robert Bilger, Cynthia Johnson, and Ruth Watkins. This work was supported in part by grants from NIH (NIDCDS R03-01600 and R29-2250). The second author also received support from The Center for Advanced Study, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
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