Priming the Visual Recognition of Spoken Words A preliminary investigation was conducted to understand the effects of word visibility and prime association factors on visual spoken word recognition in lipreading, using a related/ unrelated prime-target paradigm. Prime-target pairings were determined on the basis of paper-and-pencil word associations completed by 85 participants with normal hearing. Spoken targets included ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Priming the Visual Recognition of Spoken Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charissa R. Lansing
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Christine L. Helgeson
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: Charissa R. Lansing, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, 901 South Sixth Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: crl@uiuc.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Area Education Agency 7, Cedar Falls, Iowa.
    Currently affiliated with Area Education Agency 7, Cedar Falls, Iowa.×
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Priming the Visual Recognition of Spoken Words
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1377-1386. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1377
History: Received July 5, 1994 , Accepted July 17, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1377-1386. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1377
History: Received July 5, 1994; Accepted July 17, 1995

A preliminary investigation was conducted to understand the effects of word visibility and prime association factors on visual spoken word recognition in lipreading, using a related/ unrelated prime-target paradigm. Prime-target pairings were determined on the basis of paper-and-pencil word associations completed by 85 participants with normal hearing. Spoken targets included 60 single-syllable Modified Rhyme Test words, prerecorded on laser video disc. Participants included 20 individuals with normal hearing and at least average lipreading skill for sentence-length materials. In related prime-target pairings, more targets with a high prime association were identified than with a low prime association. In unrelated prime-target pairings, a larger number of more-visible than less-visible targets was correctly identified. Individual participant differences were not statistically significant. Results from the present study suggest implications for models of visual spoken word recognition.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported, in part, by grants from NIH (NIDCD) #DC01600 and #DC02250. We would like to thank Lynn Marassa and Heather Minch for their assistance in data collection. We appreciate the comments provided by Robert C. Bilger and David Noreen on an earlier version of this manuscript. The first author also received support from the Center for Advanced Study, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access