Effects of Picture Size and Placement on Memory for Written Words A study investigating the effects of varying size and position of line drawings in combination with written words was conducted with kindergarten students. Subjects were shown written words under four conditions that represented various size and position relationships between line drawings and orthography. After 4 consecutive days of exposure in ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1995
Effects of Picture Size and Placement on Memory for Written Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Doreen M. Blischak
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Mark A. McDaniel
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuerque
  • Contact author: Doreen M. Blischak, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
    Contact author: Doreen M. Blischak, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.×
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 1995
Effects of Picture Size and Placement on Memory for Written Words
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1356-1362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1356
History: Received October 13, 1994 , Accepted May 1, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1356-1362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1356
History: Received October 13, 1994; Accepted May 1, 1995

A study investigating the effects of varying size and position of line drawings in combination with written words was conducted with kindergarten students. Subjects were shown written words under four conditions that represented various size and position relationships between line drawings and orthography. After 4 consecutive days of exposure in an incidental learning task, both identification and recognition measures were obtained. Results showed superior performance for word-only and enhanced-word conditions, over those in which small and large line drawings were paired with written words, supporting similar research findings conducted with reading tasks. Implications are drawn for application to individuals with little or no functional speech who use graphic symbols for expressive communication.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this study was partially supported by grants from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, United States Education Department (H029D90094). The contents do not necessarily represent the policy of that agency and endorsement by the federal government is not to be assumed. Thanks to Sam Barnhouse and friends, Filip Loncke, Lyle L. Lloyd, Mary Jo Anderson, Rajinder Koul, and members of the Purdue University AAC Group for their help in preparing this manuscript.
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