Redirects: A Strategy to Increase Peer Initiations Preschoolers’ verbal abilities influence their verbal interactions with play partners. Previous research has suggested that preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI) are more likely to initiate conversations with adults than with peers, as compared to their typically developing peers. This study investigated a teacher-implemented procedure, redirects, as a means to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Redirects: A Strategy to Increase Peer Initiations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Melanie Schuele
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Nevada, Reno
  • Mabel L. Rice
    Child Language Program, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Kim A. Wilcox
    Child Language Program, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Contact author: Mabel Rice, 1082 Dole, Child Language Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045. E-mail: mabel@dole.Isi.ukans.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Redirects: A Strategy to Increase Peer Initiations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1319-1333. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1319
History: Received July 25, 1994 , Accepted April 10, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1319-1333. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1319
History: Received July 25, 1994; Accepted April 10, 1995

Preschoolers’ verbal abilities influence their verbal interactions with play partners. Previous research has suggested that preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI) are more likely to initiate conversations with adults than with peers, as compared to their typically developing peers. This study investigated a teacher-implemented procedure, redirects, as a means to facilitate initiations to peers. A redirect occurs when a child initiates to the teacher, and the teacher then suggests the child initiate to a peer, thereby redirecting the child from an adult to a peer. Four preschool boys with SLI participated in the study. The teacher training was successful in increasing the teacher’s ability to redirect the children’s initiations. The children consistently responded to redirects by initiating to peers, and most redirected initiations received conversational responses from peers. Generalization effects to spontaneous peer initiations following the intervention period were demonstrated for 2 of the boys.

Acknowledgments
The study was supported by the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute, Department of Education Award #H024U80001, Principal Investigators, Mabel L. Rice and Marion O’Brien. We thank Bethany Gertner, Jenny Heizer, and Lesley Stephens for their assistance in data collection; Pamela Hadley for her input in the planning stages of the study, assistance in data collection, and comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript; Betty Bunce for her assistance in the planning stages; and Samuel Odom for his consultation on the study. We also thank the children in LAP who participated in this study and Jennifer for implementing redirects in LAP.
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