Contingency and Breakdown: Children With SLI and Their Conversations With Mothers and Fathers The present study aimed to investigate the nature and frequency of parental recasts (both mothers and fathers) to children with SLI as compared to normal language learning children of the same language stage including their younger siblings. The comparisons were made within the framework of discourse function to include behaviors ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Contingency and Breakdown: Children With SLI and Their Conversations With Mothers and Fathers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden
    Centre for Educational Needs, School of Education, University of Manchester, England
  • Graeme D. Hutcheson
    Centre for Educational Needs, School of Education, University of Manchester, England
  • John Grove
    Centre for Educational Needs, School of Education, University of Manchester, England
  • Contact author: Gina Conti-Ramsden, Centre for Educational Needs, School of Education, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, England.
    Contact author: Gina Conti-Ramsden, Centre for Educational Needs, School of Education, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, England.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Contingency and Breakdown: Children With SLI and Their Conversations With Mothers and Fathers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1290-1302. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1290
History: Received November 16, 1994 , Accepted April 10, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1290-1302. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1290
History: Received November 16, 1994; Accepted April 10, 1995

The present study aimed to investigate the nature and frequency of parental recasts (both mothers and fathers) to children with SLI as compared to normal language learning children of the same language stage including their younger siblings. The comparisons were made within the framework of discourse function to include behaviors related to conversational contingency and conversational breakdown. Results showed that children with SLI at the early stages of development experience a simple recast gap in their linguistic input. Qualitative differences in the context in which recasts occurred were also noted. Furthermore, some differences between mothers and fathers were found. These findings are discussed in light of previous research with particular reference to the Rare Event Theory and the Bridge Hypothesis.

Acknowledgments
The current project was aided by Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Grant No. 12-FY91-0835 from the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. The authors wish to express their gratitude to Keith Nelson, Michael Tomasello, Clare Gallaway, and Bill Croft for their insightful comments on an earlier version of the manuscript. The authors also wish to thank Vivien Ward for her help with some of the transcription and coding of the data and Diane McCool for her support with statistical data preparation.
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