Transparency of One-Handed Amer-Ind Hand Signals to Nonfamiliar Viewers Thirty non-brain-damaged adults viewed 104 videotaped Amer-Ind hand signals. The majority of these hand signals were produced with one hand; 60 originally one-handed gestures and 31 left-hand adaptations of two-handed gestures were included in the data analyses. Nineteen subjects were between the ages of 20 and 30 years (younger group), ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Transparency of One-Handed Amer-Ind Hand Signals to Nonfamiliar Viewers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cheryl R. Campbell
    The University of Kansas, Medical Center School of Allied Health, Department of Hearing and Speech, Kansas City
  • Susan T. Jackson
    The University of Kansas, Medical Center School of Allied Health, Department of Hearing and Speech, Kansas City
  • Contact author: Susan T. Jackson, University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Hearing and Speech, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66160–7605. E-mail: sjackson@kumc.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the Shawnee Public Schools, Shawnee, OK.
    Currently affiliated with the Shawnee Public Schools, Shawnee, OK.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Transparency of One-Handed Amer-Ind Hand Signals to Nonfamiliar Viewers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1284-1289. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1284
History: Received October 27, 1994 , Accepted April 10, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1284-1289. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1284
History: Received October 27, 1994; Accepted April 10, 1995

Thirty non-brain-damaged adults viewed 104 videotaped Amer-Ind hand signals. The majority of these hand signals were produced with one hand; 60 originally one-handed gestures and 31 left-hand adaptations of two-handed gestures were included in the data analyses. Nineteen subjects were between the ages of 20 and 30 years (younger group), and 11 subjects were between the ages of 50 and 69 years (older group). After viewing each hand signal twice in succession, the subjects wrote at least one word for that signal’s meaning. The mean percentage of one-handed signals correctly identified was 48.2%; these signals varied widely in transparency (0% to 100%). The left-hand adaptations were significantly lower in transparency than the originally one-handed signals. The younger and older subjects did not differ in the mean percentage of one-handed signals they identified correctly (49.0% and 46.4%, respectively). However, some individual hand signals were easier for the younger subjects to identify; the opposite was also true.

Acknowledgments
This paper is based on a master’s thesis completed by the first author, under the direction of the second author, in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the Master of Arts degree in Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kansas. A special thanks is extended to Diane Hall for her assistance with subject recruitment. The authors gratefully acknowledge the men and women who participated in this study. Malcolm R. McNeil and two anonymous reviewers provided helpful comments and suggestions on an earlier version of this manuscript. Parts of these data were presented at the 1994 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, New Orleans, LA.
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