Comparison of Two Forms of Intensive Speech Treatment for Parkinson Disease This study investigated the effect of two forms of intensive speech treatment, (a) respiration (R) and (b) voice and respiration (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]), on the speech and voice deficits associated with Idiopathic Parkinson disease. Forty-five subjects with Idiopathic Parkinson disease completed extensive pretreatment neurological, otolaryngologicai, neuropsychological, and speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Comparison of Two Forms of Intensive Speech Treatment for Parkinson Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lorraine Olson Ramig
    Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, University of Colorado-Boulder and The Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center, Denver Center For The Performing Arts
  • Stefanie Countryman
    The Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center, Denver Center For The Performing Arts
  • Laetitia L. Thompson
    Neuropsychology Laboratory, University of Colorado, School of Medicine
  • Yoshiyuki Horii
    Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, University of Colorado-Boulder and The Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center, Denver Center For The Performing Arts
  • Contact author: Lorraine Olson Ramig, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, University of Colorado, Campus Box 409, Boulder, CO 80309–0409. E-mail: ramig@spot.colorado.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Comparison of Two Forms of Intensive Speech Treatment for Parkinson Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1232-1251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1232
History: Received November 18, 1994 , Accepted April 28, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1232-1251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1232
History: Received November 18, 1994; Accepted April 28, 1995

This study investigated the effect of two forms of intensive speech treatment, (a) respiration (R) and (b) voice and respiration (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]), on the speech and voice deficits associated with Idiopathic Parkinson disease. Forty-five subjects with Idiopathic Parkinson disease completed extensive pretreatment neurological, otolaryngologicai, neuropsychological, and speech assessments. All subjects completed 16 sessions of intensive speech treatment, 4 times a week for 1 month. Pre- and post-treatment measures included intensity and maximum duration during sustained vowel phonation. Intensity, habitual fundamental frequency, fundamental frequency variability, and utterance and pause duration were measured during reading of the “Rainbow Passage” and conversational monologue as well. Family and subject self-ratings were completed pre- and post-treatment for the perceptual variables loudness, monotonicity, hoarseness, overall intelligibility, and initiation of conversation. Significant pre- to post-treatment improvements were observed for more variables and were of greater magnitude for the subjects who received the voice and respiration treatment (LSVT). Only subjects who received the LSVT rated a significant decrease post-treatment on the impact of Parkinson disease on their communication. Correlations between descriptive prognostic variables (i.e., stage of disease, speech/voice severity rating, depression, and time since diagnosis) and magnitude of treatment-related change indicated these factors did not significantly predict treatment effectiveness. These findings suggest that intensive voice and respiration (LSVT) treatment, focusing on increased vocal fold adduction and respiration, is more effective than respiration (R) treatment alone for improving vocal intensity and decreasing the impact of Parkinson disease on communication.

Acknowledgments
The research presented here was supported by NIH grant No. RO1DC01150. Our deepest gratitude is extended to the subjects who participated in this research study. The authors would like to thank Annette Arnone Pawlas and Drs. Marshall Smith, Margaret Hoehn, Christopher O’Brien, and Christopher Dromey for their assistance during various parts of this research.
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