Factor Analysis of Proficient Esophageal Speech: Toward a Multidimensional Model This study identified acoustic patterns in the speech samples of 26 esophageal speakers judged by experienced listeners to be highly proficient and intelligible. Tape-recorded readings were acoustically analyzed in terms of frequency, intensity, and duration variables. Application of two multidimensional statistical procedures, factor analysis and cluster analysis, revealed four distinctive ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1995
Factor Analysis of Proficient Esophageal Speech: Toward a Multidimensional Model
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dianne C. Slavin
    Long Island University, C.W. Post, Brookville, NY
  • Carole T. Ferrand
    Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
  • Contact author: Dianne C. Slavin, PhD, 22 Nevinwood Place, Huntington Station, NY 11746.
    Contact author: Dianne C. Slavin, PhD, 22 Nevinwood Place, Huntington Station, NY 11746.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1995
Factor Analysis of Proficient Esophageal Speech: Toward a Multidimensional Model
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1224-1231. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1224
History: Received November 11, 1994 , Accepted April 5, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1995, Vol. 38, 1224-1231. doi:10.1044/jshr.3806.1224
History: Received November 11, 1994; Accepted April 5, 1995

This study identified acoustic patterns in the speech samples of 26 esophageal speakers judged by experienced listeners to be highly proficient and intelligible. Tape-recorded readings were acoustically analyzed in terms of frequency, intensity, and duration variables. Application of two multidimensional statistical procedures, factor analysis and cluster analysis, revealed four distinctive acoustic profiles that captured all 26 subjects. The multidimensional model derived from these profiles maintains important individual differences in alaryngeal speech style.

Acknowledgments
This paper is based on a doctoral dissertation supervised by Elizabeth L. Allen. We also wish to thank Beatrice Krauss and Yoshyuki Horii for their assistance in data analysis. This research was supported by the ICD-International Center for the Disabled, 340 East 24 Street, New York, NY.
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