Auditory Training Induces Asymmetrical Changes in Cortical Neural Activity Pre-attentive cortical evoked potentials reflect training-induced changes in neural activity associated with speech-sound training. Seven normal-hearing young adults were trained to identify two synthetic speech variants of the syllable /ba/. As subjects learned to correctly identify the two stimuli, changes in P1, N1, and P2 amplitudes were observed. Of particular ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 2002
Auditory Training Induces Asymmetrical Changes in Cortical Neural Activity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly L. Tremblay, PhD
    University of Washington Seattle
  • Nina Kraus
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Kelly Tremblay, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105.
    Contact author: Kelly Tremblay, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: tremblay@u.washington.edu
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 2002
Auditory Training Induces Asymmetrical Changes in Cortical Neural Activity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2002, Vol. 45, 564-572. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/045)
History: Received April 12, 2001 , Accepted October 30, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2002, Vol. 45, 564-572. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/045)
History: Received April 12, 2001; Accepted October 30, 2001

Pre-attentive cortical evoked potentials reflect training-induced changes in neural activity associated with speech-sound training. Seven normal-hearing young adults were trained to identify two synthetic speech variants of the syllable /ba/. As subjects learned to correctly identify the two stimuli, changes in P1, N1, and P2 amplitudes were observed. Of particular interest is that P1, N1, and P2 components of the N1-P2 complex responded differently to listening training. That is, significant changes in P1 and N1 amplitude were recorded over the right but not the left hemisphere. In contrast, increases in P2 were observed bilaterally. These results indicate that training-related changes in neural activity are reflected in far-field aggregate neural responses and that distinct patterns of neural change, perhaps reflecting hemispheric specialization, likely represent different aspects of auditory function .

Acknowledgments
We acknowledge the support from NIH - NIDCD, DC01510, and thank Lynne Werner, Michael Piskosz, and Christina Kejriwal for their assistance.
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