Interaction of Speech Coders and Atypical Speech I Effects on Speech Intelligibility Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2002
Interaction of Speech Coders and Atypical Speech I
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald G. Jamieson
    National Centre for Audiology The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, Canada
  • Vijay Parsa, PhD
    National Centre for Audiology The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, Canada
  • Moneca C. Price
    National Centre for Audiology The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, Canada
  • James Till
    California State University Long Beach
  • Contact author: Vijay Parsa, PhD, National Centre for Audiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6G 1H1.
    Contact author: Vijay Parsa, PhD, National Centre for Audiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6G 1H1.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: parsa@nca.uwo.ca
  • * Currently affiliated with the Canadian Hearing Society, Ottawa Regional Office
    Currently affiliated with the Canadian Hearing Society, Ottawa Regional Office×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2002
Interaction of Speech Coders and Atypical Speech I
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2002, Vol. 45, 482-493. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/038)
History: Received July 2, 2001 , Accepted March 7, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2002, Vol. 45, 482-493. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/038)
History: Received July 2, 2001; Accepted March 7, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

We investigated how standard speech coders, currently used in modern communication systems, affect the intelligibility of the speech of persons who have common speech and voice disorders. Three standardized speech coders (viz., GSM 6.10 [RPE-LTP], FS1016 [CELP], FS1015 [LPC]) and two speech coders based on subband processing were evaluated for their performance. Coder effects were assessed by measuring the intelligibility of vowels and consonants both before and after processing by the speech coders. Native English talkers who had normal hearing identified these speech sounds. Results confirmed that (a) all coders reduce the intelligibility of spoken language; (b) these effects occur in a consistent manner, with the GSM and CELP coders providing the least degradation relative to the original unprocessed speech; and (c) coders interact with individual voices so that speech is degraded differentially for different talkers.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, and the Ontario Ministry of Health. We thank Sam Kheirallah for his help during the initial phases of this project.
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