Botox Treatment in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia A Meta-Analysis Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2002
Botox Treatment in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frank Boutsen, PhD
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Oklahoma Norman
  • Michael P. Cannito
    School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology University of Memphis Memphis, TN
  • Merlin Taylor
    Department of Communication Disorders and Special Education Indiana State University Terre Haute
  • Brenda Bender
    Speech and Hearing Clinic Abilene Christian University Abilene, TX
  • Contact author: Frank Boutsen, PhD, 825 Northeast 14th Street, The University of Oklahoma, Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73190.
    Contact author: Frank Boutsen, PhD, 825 Northeast 14th Street, The University of Oklahoma, Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73190.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: Frank-Boutsen@ouhsc.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2002
Botox Treatment in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2002, Vol. 45, 469-481. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/037)
History: Received September 28, 2001 , Accepted February 26, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2002, Vol. 45, 469-481. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/037)
History: Received September 28, 2001; Accepted February 26, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 37

Over the years many studies have been conducted to document the treatment effects of Botulinum toxin type A in adductor spasmodic dysphonia. The results of these studies have led to the view that overall Botulinum toxin treatment is moderately effective. This study reviews efficacy research qualitatively and quantitatively to determine the extent to which this conclusion is fully supported by the data. Although the data indicate moderate overall improvement as a result of Botulinum toxin treatment, they also suggest significant variation across patients, measurements, and treatment conditions. This result, together with methodological limitations and lack of standardization in BT efficacy research, justifies caution when making inferences regarding BT treatment benefit in adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

Acknowledgments
We wish to acknowledge Dr. Espinoza-Varas for his helpful comments during the preparation of this manuscript. This research was supported in part by Grant 1-R15-DC/OD02299-01A1 from the National Institutes of Health (NIDCD; M. P. Cannito, Principal Investigator).
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