Recognition of Multiply Degraded Speech by Young and Elderly Listeners This study investigated the hypothesis that age effects exert an increased influence on speech recognition performance as the number of acoustic degradations Of the speech signal increases. Four groups participated: young listeners with normal hearing, elderly listeners with normal hearing, young listeners with hearing loss, and elderly listeners with hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1995
Recognition of Multiply Degraded Speech by Young and Elderly Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Gordon-Salant
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Peter J. Fitzgibbons
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • Contact author: Sandra Gordon-Salant, PhD, Dept. of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Lefrak Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. E-mail: sgordon@BSS1.umd.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1995
Recognition of Multiply Degraded Speech by Young and Elderly Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1150-1156. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1150
History: Received January 17, 1995 , Accepted May 11, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1150-1156. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1150
History: Received January 17, 1995; Accepted May 11, 1995

This study investigated the hypothesis that age effects exert an increased influence on speech recognition performance as the number of acoustic degradations Of the speech signal increases. Four groups participated: young listeners with normal hearing, elderly listeners with normal hearing, young listeners with hearing loss, and elderly listeners with hearing loss. Recognition was assessed for sentence materials degraded by noise, reverberation, or time compression, either in isolation or in binary combinations. Performance scores were converted to an equivalent signal-to-noise ratio index to facilitate direct comparison of the effects of different forms of stimulus degradation. Age effects were observed primarily in multiple degradation conditions featuring time compression of the stimuli. These results are discussed in terms of a postulated change in functional signal-to-noise ratio with increasing age.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Aging awarded to the first author. The authors wish to thank Linda Carr-Kraft for her assistance in collecting the data reported in this paper.
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