Familial Aggregation of Phonological Disorders: Results From a 28-Year Follow-Up This investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal speech and educational outcome study involving approximately 400 normally developing children that was initiated in 1960. From this database, two groups of subjects (now aged 32–34), their spouses, and all of their offspring over the age of 3:0 (years:months) completed a battery ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1995
Familial Aggregation of Phonological Disorders: Results From a 28-Year Follow-Up
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Felsenfeld
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Matt McGue
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Patricia A. Broen
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Susan Felsenfeld, PhD, Department of Communication, Division of Communication Science & Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, 3347 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.
    Contact author: Susan Felsenfeld, PhD, Department of Communication, Division of Communication Science & Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, 3347 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1995
Familial Aggregation of Phonological Disorders: Results From a 28-Year Follow-Up
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1091-1107. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1091
History: Received December 5, 1994 , Accepted March 23, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1091-1107. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1091
History: Received December 5, 1994; Accepted March 23, 1995

This investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal speech and educational outcome study involving approximately 400 normally developing children that was initiated in 1960. From this database, two groups of subjects (now aged 32–34), their spouses, and all of their offspring over the age of 3:0 (years:months) completed a battery of cognitive-linguistic and interview measures. One group (probands) consisted of 24 adults with a documented history of a moderate phonological-language disorder that persisted through at least the end of the first grade. The other group (controls) consisted of 28 adults who were known to have had normal articulation abilities as children. Results of this study demonstrated that, in comparison to the children of controls, the children of the proband subjects performed significantly more poorly on all tests of articulation and expressive language functioning and were significantly more likely to have received articulation treatment. There was, however, no evidence that specific misarticulations or phonological processes traveled within proband families. These results are in agreement with those of most previous family studies that have demonstrated an increased rate of occurrence of speech-language disorders of unknown origin in families including a first-degree relative who is similarly affected.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge the many contributions of Annetta Larsen, Jo Prouty, and Mildred Templin, all of whom were instrumental in ensuring the success of this project. We would also like to thank Larry Shriberg for his many helpful editorial suggestions on an earlier draft of this manuscript. Portions of this work were presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in St. Louis, Missouri, November 1989, and at the annual meeting of the Behavior Genetics Association, Charlottesville, Virginia, June 1989. This research was supported by NINCDS Grant #RO1 NS-25633 and a Grant-in-Aid from the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota. Interested readers may obtain a table displaying the raw subject data by writing to the first author at the contact author’s address.
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