Comparison of Personalized Cueing and Provided Cueing on the Facilitation of Verbal Labeling by Aphasic Subjects This study investigated the effects of two associative learning tasks on aphasic subjects’ labeling of novel symbols. It was designed to determine if aphasie subjects need to develop their own associations for word-symbols pairs (personalized cueing) to obtain the long-term labeling benefits observed in prior research or if comparable results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1995
Comparison of Personalized Cueing and Provided Cueing on the Facilitation of Verbal Labeling by Aphasic Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald B. Freed
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Robert C. Marshall
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Marilyn A. Nippold
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Rhode Island, Kingston
    Currently affiliated with the University of Rhode Island, Kingston×
  • Contact author: Donald B. Freed, PhD, Speech Pathology and Audiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3710 Southwest U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97207.
    Contact author: Donald B. Freed, PhD, Speech Pathology and Audiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3710 Southwest U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97207.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1995
Comparison of Personalized Cueing and Provided Cueing on the Facilitation of Verbal Labeling by Aphasic Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1081-1090. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1081
History: Received May 23, 1994 , Accepted March 20, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1081-1090. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1081
History: Received May 23, 1994; Accepted March 20, 1995

This study investigated the effects of two associative learning tasks on aphasic subjects’ labeling of novel symbols. It was designed to determine if aphasie subjects need to develop their own associations for word-symbols pairs (personalized cueing) to obtain the long-term labeling benefits observed in prior research or if comparable results are obtained when “ready-made” associations are used during training (provided cueing). The results showed that the two cueing techniques were equal in their ability to elicit correct responses from the subjects. The results also demonstrated the long-term effectiveness of both cueing procedures on the subjects’ labeling accuracy up to 30 days after training was discontinued.

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