Temporal Characteristics of Speech in Simultaneous Communication The purpose of this investigation was twofold: (a) to determine if there are changes in specific temporal characteristics of speech that occur during simultaneous communication, and (b) to determine if known temporal rules of spoken English are disrupted during simultaneous communication. Ten speakers uttered sentences consisting of a carrier phrase ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1995
Temporal Characteristics of Speech in Simultaneous Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert L. Whitehead
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester, NY
  • Nicholas Schiavetti
    State University of New York at Geneseo
  • Brenda H. Whitehead
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester, NY
  • Dale Evan Metz
    State University of New York at Geneseo
  • Contact author: Robert L. Whitehead, PhD, NTID Department of Communication Research, Rochester Institute of Technology, Lyndon Baines Johnson Building, 52 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623–5604. E-mail: rwwncr@rit.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1995
Temporal Characteristics of Speech in Simultaneous Communication
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1014-1024. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1014
History: Received December 9, 1994 , Accepted March 27, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1995, Vol. 38, 1014-1024. doi:10.1044/jshr.3805.1014
History: Received December 9, 1994; Accepted March 27, 1995

The purpose of this investigation was twofold: (a) to determine if there are changes in specific temporal characteristics of speech that occur during simultaneous communication, and (b) to determine if known temporal rules of spoken English are disrupted during simultaneous communication. Ten speakers uttered sentences consisting of a carrier phrase and experimental CVC words under conditions of: (a) speech, (b) speech combined with signed English, and (c) speech combined with signed English for every word except the CVC word that was fingerspelled. The temporal features investigated included: (a) sentence duration, (b) experimental CVC word duration, (c) vowel duration in experimental CVC words, (d) pause duration before and after experimental CVC words, and (e) consonantal effects on vowel duration. Results indicated that for all durational measures, the speech/sign/fingerspelling condition was longest, followed by the speech/sign condition, with the speech condition being shortest. It was also found that for all three speaking conditions, vowels were longer in duration when preceding voiced consonants than vowels preceding their voiceless cognates, and that a low vowel was longer in duration than a high vowel. These findings indicate that speakers consistently reduced their rate of speech when using simultaneous communication, but did not violate these specific temporal rules of English important for consonant and vowel perception.

Acknowledgment
This research was conducted at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf in the course of an agreement between the Rochester Institute of Technology and the U.S. Department of Education.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access