A Comparison of Language Achievement in Children With Cochlear Implants and Children Using Hearing Aids English language achievement of 29 prelingually deaf children with 3 or more years of cochlear implant (CI) experience was compared to the achievement levels of prelingually deaf children who did not have such CI experience. Language achievement was measured by the Rhode Island Test of Language Structure (RITLS), a measure ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 1999
A Comparison of Language Achievement in Children With Cochlear Implants and Children Using Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Linda Spencer
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Sarah Flock
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Rich Tyler
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Bruce Gantz
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: J. Bruce Tomblin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
    Contact author: J. Bruce Tomblin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: J-Tomblin@UIOWA.EDU
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 1999
A Comparison of Language Achievement in Children With Cochlear Implants and Children Using Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1999, Vol. 42, 497-511. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4202.497
History: Received March 12, 1998 , Accepted September 23, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1999, Vol. 42, 497-511. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4202.497
History: Received March 12, 1998; Accepted September 23, 1998

English language achievement of 29 prelingually deaf children with 3 or more years of cochlear implant (CI) experience was compared to the achievement levels of prelingually deaf children who did not have such CI experience. Language achievement was measured by the Rhode Island Test of Language Structure (RITLS), a measure of signed and spoken sentence comprehension, and the Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn), a measure of expressive (signed and spoken) English grammar. When the CI users were compared with their deaf age mates who contributed to the norms of the RITLS, it was found that CI users achieved significantly better scores. Likewise, we found that CI users performed better than 29 deaf children who used hearing aids (HAs) with respect to English grammar achievement as indexed by the IPSyn. Additionally, we found that chronological age highly correlated with IPSyn levels only among the non-CI users, whereas length of CI experience was significantly correlated with IPSyn scores for CI users. Finally, clear differences between those with and without CI experience were found by 2 years of post-implant experience. These data provide evidence that children who receive CIs benefit in the form of improved English language comprehension and production.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Research Grant 4 P50 DC 00242 awarded to the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa, from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access