Tutorial Survival Analysis—A Statistic for Clinical, Efficacy, and Theoretical Applications Tutorial
Tutorial  |   April 1999
Tutorial
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frederic A. Gruber
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Frederic A. Gruber, PhD, Lamar University, Department of Communication Disorders, PO Box 10076, Beaumont, TX 77710.
    Contact author: Frederic A. Gruber, PhD, Lamar University, Department of Communication Disorders, PO Box 10076, Beaumont, TX 77710.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: gruberfa@hal.lamar.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.
    Currently affiliated with Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   April 1999
Tutorial
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1999, Vol. 42, 432-447. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4202.432
History: Received March 10, 1998 , Accepted July 23, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1999, Vol. 42, 432-447. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4202.432
History: Received March 10, 1998; Accepted July 23, 1998

Current demands for increased research attention to therapeutic efficacy, efficiency, and also for improved developmental models call for analysis of longitudinal outcome data. Statistical treatment of longitudinal speech and language data is difficult, but there is a family of statistical techniques in common use in medicine, actuarial science, manufacturing, and sociology that has not been used in speech or language research. Survival analysis is introduced as a method that avoids many of the statistical problems of other techniques because it treats time as the outcome. In survival analysis, probabilities are calculated not just for groups but also for individuals in a group. This is a major advantage for clinical work. This paper provides a basic introduction to nonparametric and semiparametric survival analysis using speech outcomes as examples. A brief discussion of potential conflicts between actuarial analysis and clinical intuition is also provided.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Preparation of this article was, in part, supported by Research Grant RO1 DC00496 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Lawrence D. Shriberg, principal investigator. This article is adapted from part of a PhD dissertation at the University of Wisconsin–Madison under the supervision of Lawrence D. Shriberg. This article also benefited from the advice of Robin Chapman, Raymond D. Kent, Colleen Moore, Dolores (Dee) Vetter, Diane Austin, Peter Flipsen Jr., Joan Kwiatkowski, Hye-Kyeung Seung, David Wilson, and three anonymous reviewers.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access