Language and Reading Outcomes to Age 9 in Late-Talking Toddlers Language and reading outcomes at 6 to 9 years of age were examined in a sample of 34 children who were late talkers as toddlers. The late talkers, who all had normal nonverbal ability and age-adequate receptive language at intake, were compared to a group of 25 typically developing children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
Language and Reading Outcomes to Age 9 in Late-Talking Toddlers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leslie Rescorla, PhD
    Bryn Mawr College Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Contact author: Leslie Rescorla, PhD, Department of Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 101 N. Merion Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010. E-mail: lrescorl@brynmawr.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
Language and Reading Outcomes to Age 9 in Late-Talking Toddlers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 360-371. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/028)
History: Received May 2, 2001 , Accepted January 2, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 360-371. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/028)
History: Received May 2, 2001; Accepted January 2, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 120

Language and reading outcomes at 6 to 9 years of age were examined in a sample of 34 children who were late talkers as toddlers. The late talkers, who all had normal nonverbal ability and age-adequate receptive language at intake, were compared to a group of 25 typically developing children matched at intake (24 to 31 months) on age, socioeconomic status, and nonverbal ability. Late talkers performed in the average range on most language tasks by age 5. However, they had significantly poorer scores on most language measures through age 9. The groups did not differ in reading skills at age 6 or 7, but the late talkers were slightly less skilled in reading at ages 8 and 9. Findings suggest that slow early language development reflects a predisposition for slower acquisition and lower asymptotic performance in a wide range of language-related skills into middle childhood.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants to the author from the Bryn Mawr College Faculty Research Fund and from the National Institutes of Health (NICHD Area Grant 1-R15-HD22355-01; NIDCD R01-DC00807). The author wishes to thank Susan Chaplick for her speech and language assessments, Joan Manhardt for her psychological testing assistance, and the parents and children whose participation made this research possible.
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