Acoustic Cues to the Voicing Feature in Tracheoesophageal Speech Tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers often have difficulty producing the voiced/ voiceless distinction. This limitation has been attributed to use of the pharyngoe-sophageal segment as the phonatory source. The nature of this tissue may preclude precise control of voicing onset, a contributing cue to a phoneme's voicing feature, at least in laryngeal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
Acoustic Cues to the Voicing Feature in Tracheoesophageal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffrey P. Searl, PhD
    Communication Disorders Department Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH
  • Mary A. Carpenter
    Hearing and Speech Department University of Kansas Medical Center Kansas City
  • Contact author: Jeffrey P. Searl, PhD, Communication Disorders Department, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403. E-mail: jsearl@bgnet.bgsu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
Acoustic Cues to the Voicing Feature in Tracheoesophageal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 282-294. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/022)
History: Received August 28, 2001 , Accepted December 17, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 282-294. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/022)
History: Received August 28, 2001; Accepted December 17, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers often have difficulty producing the voiced/ voiceless distinction. This limitation has been attributed to use of the pharyngoe-sophageal segment as the phonatory source. The nature of this tissue may preclude precise control of voicing onset, a contributing cue to a phoneme's voicing feature, at least in laryngeal speech. The purpose of this study was to determine whether voiced and voiceless consonants produced by TE speakers could be differentiated from those produced by laryngeal speakers using four acoustic measures associated with the voicing characteristic of consonants in laryngeal speech. Sixteen TE and ten laryngeal speakers produced five stop and fricative cognate pairs embedded in a carrier phrase. Three of the four acoustic measures contributed significantly to the discriminant models that differentiated accurately perceived TE and laryngeal samples. The three variables were consonant sound pressure level, consonant duration, and preceding vowel duration. In general, values for each measure were higher/longer for the TE group. The discriminant functions were interpreted as a reflection of TE speaker attempts at overarticulation.

Acknowledgment
This project was a portion of a dissertation completed by the first author under the direction of the second author.
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