Biological Mechanisms Underlying Voice Changes Due to Dehydration Four vocally untrained healthy adults, 2 men and 2 women, completed the study. A double-blind placebo-controlled approach was used to administer three treatments to each participant on separate days. Drugs treatments involved a single 60-mg dose of a diuretic, Lasix (LA), on one day, and a single 50-mg dose of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
Biological Mechanisms Underlying Voice Changes Due to Dehydration
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine Verdolini, PhD
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Young Min
    University of California San Diego
  • Ingo R. Titze
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center Denver Center for the Performing Arts National Center for Voice and Speech
  • Jon Lemke
    Department of Biostatistics of the University of Iowa College of Public Health Iowa City
  • Kice Brown
    Department of Biostatistics of the University of Iowa College of Public Health Iowa City
  • Miriam van Mersbergen
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis/St. Paul
  • Jack Jiang
    Department of Communication Disorders Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Kim Fisher
    Department of Communication Disorders Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Katherine Verdolini, PhD, Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, 4033 Forbes Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15260. E-mail: kittie@csd.pitt.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
Biological Mechanisms Underlying Voice Changes Due to Dehydration
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 268-281. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/021)
History: Received August 13, 2001 , Accepted December 5, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 268-281. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/021)
History: Received August 13, 2001; Accepted December 5, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 66

Four vocally untrained healthy adults, 2 men and 2 women, completed the study. A double-blind placebo-controlled approach was used to administer three treatments to each participant on separate days. Drugs treatments involved a single 60-mg dose of a diuretic, Lasix (LA), on one day, and a single 50-mg dose of an oral antihistamine, diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DH), on another day. A third day involved the administration of a placebo, sugar pills (SP). Critical posttreatment measures were weight (kg), which estimated systemic dehydration, saliva viscosity (centipoise), which estimated secretion dehydration, and phona-tion threshold pressure (PTP, in cm H2O), at high pitches, which indicated pulmonary drive for phonation. The central experimental question was: Does systemic dehydration, or secretory dehydration, or both, mediate increases in PTP that are known to occur following dehydration treatments? The results showed that LA induced systemic dehydration, as shown by a decrease in total body mass of about 1%. Weight losses were seen during a 1- to 4-hour block following drug administration and persisted for at least 8 hours thereafter. PTPs also increased in that condition, about 23% relative to baseline, but only several hours after whole-body dehydration was initially seen (5–12 hours after drug administration). In contrast, no evidence was seen that DH accomplished either secretory dehydration or PTP shifts. The results indicate that systemic dehydration can mediate PTP increases. The influence of secretory dehydration on PTP is unclear.

Acknowledgments
A version of this paper was presented at the Twenty-Fifth Annual Symposium: Care of the Professional Voice, Philadelphia, PA, June 1996. The work was partially supported by Grant Nos. P000976 and K08 DC 00139 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors thank Elease White, Brenda Tomashumas, Shani Mittelburg, Dr. Michael Bayerl, Tanya Shipkowitz, Dr. Ann Chang, Ryan Branski, and Diane Ronan for their invaluable assistance.
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