Final Consonant Discrimination in Children Effects of Phonological Disorder, Vocabulary Size, and Articulatory Accuracy Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
Final Consonant Discrimination in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Edwards, PhD
    Ohio State University Columbus
  • Robert A. Fox
    Ohio State University Columbus
  • Catherine L. Rogers
    University of South Florida Tampa
  • Contact author: Jan Edwards, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, 110 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: edwards.212@osu.edu
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
Final Consonant Discrimination in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 231-242. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/018)
History: Received June 5, 2001 , Accepted November 13, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2002, Vol. 45, 231-242. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/018)
History: Received June 5, 2001; Accepted November 13, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 51

Preschool-age children with phonological disorders were compared to their typically developing age peers on their ability to discriminate CVC words that differed only in the identity of the final consonant in whole-word and gated conditions. The performance of three age groups of typically developing children and adults was also assessed on the same task. Children with phonological disorders performed more poorly than age-matched peers, and younger typically developing children performed more poorly than older children and adults, even when the entire CVC word was presented. Performance in the whole-word condition was correlated with receptive vocabulary size and a measure of articulatory accuracy across all children. These results suggest that there is a complex relationship among word learning skills, the ability to attend to fine phonetic detail, and the acquisition of articulatory-acoustic and acoustic-auditory representations.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIDCD grant # R01 DC02932 to Jan Edwards and by NIH training grant # T32 DC0051 to Robert A. Fox. We thank the children who participated in the study, the parents who gave their consent, and the schools and clinics at which the data were collected. For assistance in stimuli preparation, data collection, and analysis, we thank Erin Casey, Lynn Carahaly, Lisa Draper, Heidi Hochstetler, Maryann Holtschulte, Bridgett Isermann, Satoko Katagiri, Benjamin Munson, Christine Pencheff, Laurie Vasicek, Amy Vitale, and David White.
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