Adult Partner-Augmented Communication Input to Youth With Mental Retardation Using the System for Augmenting Language (SAL) The primary purpose of this study was to characterize the frequency and nature of augmented input that adult partners provided to 13 youth with mental retardation as they began to use the System for Augmenting Language (SAL). Analyses of youth-partner interactions revealed differences in the frequency with which home and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
Adult Partner-Augmented Communication Input to Youth With Mental Retardation Using the System for Augmenting Language (SAL)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rose A. Sevcik
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Mary Ann Romski
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Ruth V. Watkins
    University of Illinois-Champaign-Urbana
  • Kim P. Deffebach
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Contact author: Rose A. Sevcik, PhD, Language Research Center, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303. E-mail: LRCRAS@PANTHER.GSU.EDU
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
Adult Partner-Augmented Communication Input to Youth With Mental Retardation Using the System for Augmenting Language (SAL)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 902-912. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.902
History: Received August 29, 1994 , Accepted February 20, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 902-912. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.902
History: Received August 29, 1994; Accepted February 20, 1995

The primary purpose of this study was to characterize the frequency and nature of augmented input that adult partners provided to 13 youth with mental retardation as they began to use the System for Augmenting Language (SAL). Analyses of youth-partner interactions revealed differences in the frequency with which home and school partners provided aug-mented input and in the manner and style of home and school partners' augmented input, particularly in directiveness and position of lexigram symbols within utterances. Overall, partners naturally provided augmented input in a manner likely to promote youth's learning of the SAL.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by grant NICHD-06016, which sustains the Language Research Center of Georgia State University. Additional support was provided by the Department of Communication and the College of Arts and Sciences, Georgia State University. The initial analyses of these data were conducted while Ruth V. Watkins was a Language Research Center pre-doctoral summer intern from the University of Kansas.
The authors gratefully acknowledge the youth who participated in this study, their families, and the Clayton County school personnel for their enthusiastic cooperation during the conduct of the longitudinal study. We also wish to thank Joselyn Cassidy, Rhonda McDaniel, Lynn Nicholaysen, Rebecca Reumann, Alice Taffar, and Krista Wilkinson who collected the data set, David Washburn for writing the OBSERVE software program, and Greg Kato, Bronwyn Robinson, and Wendy Sundgren for data summary, editorial, and graphic assistance. Earlier versions of this paper was presented at the annual meeting of the American Association on Mental Retardation, May 1989, and the Annual Meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 1989.
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