Speaking Rate, Articulatory Speed, and Linguistic Processing in Children and Adolescents With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Two studies were conducted to examine speaking rate following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood and adolescence. Study 1 focused on longitudinal changes in speaking rate in 9 subjects with severe TBI and their age-matched control subjects. Physical measurements of speaking rate (in syllables/sec) were made from spontaneous speech samples ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
Speaking Rate, Articulatory Speed, and Linguistic Processing in Children and Adolescents With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas F. Campbell
    Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh
  • Christine A. Dollaghan
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Contact author. Thomas F. Campbell, PhD, Department of Audiology and Communication Disorders, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 3705 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213. E-mail: kelsey@vms.cis.pitt.edu
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
Speaking Rate, Articulatory Speed, and Linguistic Processing in Children and Adolescents With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 864-875. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.864
History: Received August 10, 1994 , Accepted January 31, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 864-875. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.864
History: Received August 10, 1994; Accepted January 31, 1995

Two studies were conducted to examine speaking rate following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood and adolescence. Study 1 focused on longitudinal changes in speaking rate in 9 subjects with severe TBI and their age-matched control subjects. Physical measurements of speaking rate (in syllables/sec) were made from spontaneous speech samples obtained from each subject during three sampling sessions over a 13-month period. Although the average speaking rate of the group with TBI was slower than that of the control group at all three sampling sessions, an examination of the data from individual subject pairs revealed markedly slower speaking rates in only 5 of the 9 subjects with TBI at the final sampling session. The perceptual significance of slowed speaking rates in these 5 subjects was confirmed through subjective ratings by naive listeners. In Study 2, the contributions of two potential causes of slowed speaking rate were explored: reduced articulatory speed and increased pausing believed to be associated with linguistic processing difficulties. It is hypothesized that articulatory speed and linguistic processing speed may contribute independently to slowed speaking rates more than 1 year after TBI.

Acknowledgments
Support for these studies was provided by the Alberta Mental Health Advisory Council and the M.S.I. Foundation of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. This project was also funded, in part, by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (DC 01328). We thank Adena Honig for her assistance in measuring speaking rate, and we thank Dorothy Aram, Julie Masterson, and Ronald Netsell for their comments and suggestions concerning this work.
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