A Phonologically Based Analysis of Misspellings by Third Graders With Disordered-Phonology Histories Misspellings evidenced in written responses of third graders during administration of a battery containing 25 true words and 20 nonsense syllable items were analyzed phonologically. Children with histories of disordered phonologies evidenced more phonologically based deviations in their written misspellings than did their peers who had experienced normal phonological development. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
A Phonologically Based Analysis of Misspellings by Third Graders With Disordered-Phonology Histories
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Clarke-Klein
    Wichita State University, Wichita, KS
  • Barbara Williams Hodson
    Wichita State University, Wichita, KS
  • Contact author: Barbara Hodson, Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Avenue, Wichita, KS 67260-0075. E-Mail: bhodson@wsuhub.uc.twsu.edu
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
A Phonologically Based Analysis of Misspellings by Third Graders With Disordered-Phonology Histories
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 839-849. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.839
History: Received June 1, 1994 , Accepted December 22, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 839-849. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.839
History: Received June 1, 1994; Accepted December 22, 1994

Misspellings evidenced in written responses of third graders during administration of a battery containing 25 true words and 20 nonsense syllable items were analyzed phonologically. Children with histories of disordered phonologies evidenced more phonologically based deviations in their written misspellings than did their peers who had experienced normal phonological development. In addition, the children with disordered-phonology histories relied more on less productive spelling strategies and evidenced poorer phonological awareness skills than their peers with normal-phonology histories.

Acknowledgments
The authors are indebted to the children, parents, teachers, and speech-language pathologists of Halifax County, Nova Scotia, for their contributions to this study. A special thanks goes to Cindy Garten and Darlene Stokes for their precision in coding the phonologically based deviations in the written spelling responses. We are also grateful for suggestions provided by Rosalind Scudder and Harold Edwards throughout the study and to Orpha Duell and James Tramill for their input regarding statistical analyses.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access