Traditional and Phonological Treatment for Teaching English Fricatives and Affricates to Koreans Non-native speakers of English are being seen for accent reduction in speech-language pathology clinics although there is little evidence that treatment is effective. Two types of treatment were evaluated. Traditional articulation-based treatment was successful for 2 native Korean speakers in improving English fricatives and affricate production. A second treatment using ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
Traditional and Phonological Treatment for Teaching English Fricatives and Affricates to Koreans
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna Marie Schmidt
    School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Kent State University, Kent, OH
  • Kelly A. Meyers
    Association of Retarded Citizens of Otsego County, Oneonta, NY
  • Contact author: Anna Marie Schmidt, PhD, School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001.
    Contact author: Anna Marie Schmidt, PhD, School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
Traditional and Phonological Treatment for Teaching English Fricatives and Affricates to Koreans
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 828-838. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.828
History: Received February 4, 1994 , Accepted September 9, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 828-838. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.828
History: Received February 4, 1994; Accepted September 9, 1994

Non-native speakers of English are being seen for accent reduction in speech-language pathology clinics although there is little evidence that treatment is effective. Two types of treatment were evaluated. Traditional articulation-based treatment was successful for 2 native Korean speakers in improving English fricatives and affricate production. A second treatment using phonologically based contrasts was also successful for the same sounds with 2 other Korean speakers. Some issues in foreign accent reduction are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Part of the writing of this paper was supported by NIH grant DC00257. This research was performed with the support of The George Washington University Speech and Hearing Department. The authors wish to thank James Hillis for advice and Helen Southwood, Murray Munro, Susan Thomas, Carol Stoel-Gammon, and an anonymous reviewer for helpful discussions and comments on a previous version of this article. An earlier version was presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, November 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. Some results were presented at the Cross-Language Perception Workshop, May 1992, in Tampa, Florida.
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