Variations Across Time in Acoustic and Electroglottographic Measures of Phonatory Function in Women With and Without Vocal Nodules The purpose of this investigation was to identify variations over time in phonatory function of women with and without vocal nodules using acoustic and electroglottographic measures. Subjects were 10 women with vocal nodules (mean age=22.1, range=19–25) and 10 women with healthy larynges (mean age=25.0, range=18–32). Electroglottographic and audio recordings of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
Variations Across Time in Acoustic and Electroglottographic Measures of Phonatory Function in Women With and Without Vocal Nodules
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly Dailey Hall
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Contact author: Kelly Dailey Hall, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115. E-mail: R10kdh1@corn.cso.niu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
Variations Across Time in Acoustic and Electroglottographic Measures of Phonatory Function in Women With and Without Vocal Nodules
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 783-793. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.783
History: Received July 12, 1994 , Accepted February 7, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 783-793. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.783
History: Received July 12, 1994; Accepted February 7, 1995

The purpose of this investigation was to identify variations over time in phonatory function of women with and without vocal nodules using acoustic and electroglottographic measures. Subjects were 10 women with vocal nodules (mean age=22.1, range=19–25) and 10 women with healthy larynges (mean age=25.0, range=18–32). Electroglottographic and audio recordings of speech were obtained for each subject over 3 consecutive days at three target times: morning, afternoon, and evening. Estimates of fundamental frequency (Hz), jitter (msec), shimmer (dB), and signal-to-noise ratio (dB) were made from a 1000 msec midportion of the vowel /α/ produced in a carrier phrase. In addition, a closed-to-open ratio was derived from the EGG duty cycle of the same 1000 msec segment and used to estimate timing characteristics of vocal fold vibration. The results showed no significant differences between the groups regarding a pattern of change in the acoustic or the EGG measures across times throughout the day. Furthermore, the experimental group demonstrated significantly lower closed-to-open ratios than the control group. With this exception, no other statistically significant differences between the groups were found.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on part of Kelly Hall’s doctoral dissertation completed at the University of Illinois under the direction of Ehud Yairi. Partial support for this work was received through a grant from the University of Illinois Research Board, principal investigator: E. Yairi; and from a Graduate College Dissertation Research Grant.
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