Pathologic Voice Type and the Acoustic Prediction of Severity We hypothesized that acoustic measures would predict dysphonic severity with differential results for pathological voice types. An instructional program based upon synthesized voice signals was developed to facilitate an awareness of prototypical voice types. Eighty phonatory samples representing normal subjects as well as patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis, vocal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
Pathologic Voice Type and the Acoustic Prediction of Severity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Martin
    Auburn University at Montgomery, Montgomery, AL
  • James Fitch
    Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Virginia Wolfe
    Auburn University at Montgomery, Montgomery, AL
  • Contact author: Virginia I. Wolfe, PhD, Speech and Hearing Clinic, Auburn University at Montgomery, 7300 University Drive, Montgomery, AL 36117-3596. E-mail: mardapa@strudel.aum.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
Pathologic Voice Type and the Acoustic Prediction of Severity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 765-771. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.765
History: Received September 26, 1994 , Accepted January 27, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 765-771. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.765
History: Received September 26, 1994; Accepted January 27, 1995

We hypothesized that acoustic measures would predict dysphonic severity with differential results for pathological voice types. An instructional program based upon synthesized voice signals was developed to facilitate an awareness of prototypical voice types. Eighty phonatory samples representing normal subjects as well as patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis, vocal nodules, and functional dysphonia were analyzed acoustically on the basis of four measures: average fundamental frequency (F0), jitter, shimmer, and harmonic/noise ratio (H/N ratio). Following training, 29 listeners classified 62% of the phonatory samples on the basis of breathy, hoarse, rough, and normal. Dysphonic severity of rough voices was predicted more successfully by H/N ratio (r2=.73) than by shimmer (r2=.43). Dysphonic severity of breathy voices was predicted only by the combined features of less jitter, more shimmer, and lower H/N ratio (r2=.74). No combination of acoustic variables was successful in the prediction of the hoarse voice type.

Acknowledgments
Partial support for this project was received from the Research Grant-ln-Aid Program, Auburn University at Montgomery. The assistance of David Walonick with the statistical analysis is gratefully acknowledged.
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