Part-Word Repetitions by Persons Who Stutter: Fragment Types and Their Articulatory Processes One of the core features of developmental stuttering is part-word repetition followed by fluent production (resolution) of the target word. The purpose of the study is to compare the spectro-temporal dimensions of fragments with the spectro-temporal dimensions of the resolution to define fragment types and develop articulatory interpretation of termination-restart ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
Part-Word Repetitions by Persons Who Stutter: Fragment Types and Their Articulatory Processes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nagalapura S. Viswanath
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Amy T. Neel
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Nagalapura S. Viswanath, PhD, Stuttering Center Speech Motor Control Laboratory, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, 6550 Fannin—Suite 1801, Houston, TX 77030. E-mail: viswanat@bcm.tmc.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
Part-Word Repetitions by Persons Who Stutter: Fragment Types and Their Articulatory Processes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 740-750. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.740
History: Received July 26, 1994 , Accepted January 4, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1995, Vol. 38, 740-750. doi:10.1044/jshr.3804.740
History: Received July 26, 1994; Accepted January 4, 1995

One of the core features of developmental stuttering is part-word repetition followed by fluent production (resolution) of the target word. The purpose of the study is to compare the spectro-temporal dimensions of fragments with the spectro-temporal dimensions of the resolution to define fragment types and develop articulatory interpretation of termination-restart cycles. From the acoustic recordings of six adult males who stutter, 142 stuttering events on words beginning with stops were isolated, excerpted, and digitized. The stuttering events occurred during either spontaneous speech or reading. The consecutive articulatory phases of fragments were classified and compared with the corresponding phases in resolutions. We found that (a) there are two basic types of fragments—those with vowels and those without, (b) the type of fragment produced is strongly influenced by the voicing status of the stop, (c) the fragments without vowels tend to have longer stop closure duration than the stops in the resolutions, (d) there are two subtypes in fragments with vowels—those with vowels shorter than and those with vowels longer than the vowels in the resolutions, (e) the shorter vowels differ spectro-temporally from the vowels in resolutions, and (f) the longer vowels differ temporally from the vowels in the resolutions. We discuss the articulatory implications of the acoustic data for each fragment type in the context of speech as an act designed to achieve contextually conditioned acoustic goals.

Acknowledgments
This work is based on USPHS Grant RR-05425 awarded to the first author. We gratefully acknowledge critical comments on the draft manuscript by Katherine Harris of the City University of New York and by our colleagues David B. Rosenfield and Harvey Nudelman. We also thank Dr. Molt, Dr. Watson, and the anonymous reviewer for many constructive suggestions. We gratefully acknowledge the Benjamin-Jeremiah-Gideon-Abigail-Rebekah-Maida-Foundation and the M.R. Bauer Medical Research Foundation for their support. Lastly, we want to acknowledge Amy L Joullian’s editorial assistance during the preparation of the paper.
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