Grammatical Characteristics of Children's Conversational Utterances That Contain Disfluency Clusters Selected characteristics of disfluent conversational utterances with and without disfluency clusters were examined in 14 children who stutter (CWS) and 14 children who do not stutter (CWNS). For CWS, utterances with disfluency clusters contained significantly more syllables and clausal constituents than disfluent utterances without clusters, which, in turn, contained significantly ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Grammatical Characteristics of Children's Conversational Utterances That Contain Disfluency Clusters
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth J. Logan
    University of Florida Gainsville
  • Lisa R. LaSalle
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
  • Contact author: Kenneth J. Logan, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 358 Dauer Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7420. Email: logan@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Grammatical Characteristics of Children's Conversational Utterances That Contain Disfluency Clusters
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 80-91. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.80
History: Received February 10, 1998 , Accepted August 31, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 80-91. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.80
History: Received February 10, 1998; Accepted August 31, 1998

Selected characteristics of disfluent conversational utterances with and without disfluency clusters were examined in 14 children who stutter (CWS) and 14 children who do not stutter (CWNS). For CWS, utterances with disfluency clusters contained significantly more syllables and clausal constituents than disfluent utterances without clusters, which, in turn, contained significantly more syllables, clauses, and clausal constituents than fluent utterances. For both groups of children, disfluency clusters coincided significantly more often with utterance or clause onset than they did with grammatical constituents located elsewhere within an utterance. CWNS produced a significantly greater percentage of disfluency clusters that contained grammatical revision than did CWS. No significant between-group differences were observed in terms of the number of syllables, clauses, or clausal constituents within cluster-inclusive utterances. Findings are taken to suggest that disfluency clusters are typically produced within the most complex linguistic contexts and that they reflect the effects of producing multiple syntactic constituents within an utterance.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge Nicholas Schiavetti, Susan Felsenfeld, Patricia Zebrowski, and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments and suggestions on previous versions of this paper. We also would like to thank Danielle Billowit for her assistance with data analysis. This research was supported in part by an NIH grant (DC00523) to Syracuse University. Portions of this paper were presented at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Seattle, WA, in November 1996.
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