Speech Perception in Perceivers With Hearing Loss Synergy of Multiple Modalities Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Speech Perception in Perceivers With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dominic W. Massaro
    Department of Psychology University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Michael M. Cohen
    Department of Psychology University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Contact author: Dominic W. Massaro, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064. Email: massaro@fuzzy.ucsc.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Speech Perception in Perceivers With Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 21-41. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.21
History: Received February 20, 1998 , Accepted September 16, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 21-41. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.21
History: Received February 20, 1998; Accepted September 16, 1998

Although we would expect that the role of visible speech in multimodal speech perception would have the greatest relevance to individuals with hearing impairment, relatively few analytic studies have been done with these participants. Their adequate understanding of spoken language usually requires information from several modalities or other sources of information. The framework of the fuzzy logical model of perception (FLMP) is used to assess how individuals with hearing impairment evaluate and integrate multiple sources of information. Given this framework, a distinction can be made between information and information processing. Within this framework, we can ask what information differences and information-processing differences exist among individuals with normal hearing and those with hearing impairment. Four experimental studies from the literature are analyzed to address these questions. Test items are presented under both unimodal and bimodal conditions. Of central interest is the nature of the bimodal performance as a function of the unimodal performance. The findings show that, although information differences obviously exist across different populations, their information processing involved in pattern recognition appears to be the same and is well described by the FLMP.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by grants from the Public Health Service (PHS R01 DC00236), the National Science Foundation (23818), Intel Corporation, and the University of California, Santa Cruz. The authors are appreciative of the previous researchers who provided the detailed results in their original publications and also thank Eva Agelfors for providing the detailed results of the confusion matrices in order to make the present analyses of her results possible. The helpful comments of Christopher Turner, Sandra Gordon-Salant, and two anonymous reviewers are gratefully acknowledged
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