Characterizing Knowledge Deficits in Phonological Disorders To aid the development of finer-grained measures of phonological competence within a representation-based approach to phonology, two aspects of nonsymbolic phonological knowledge (knowledge of the acoustic/perceptual space and of the articulatory/production space) were examined in 6 preschool-age children with phonological disorders and 6 typically developing age peers. To evaluate perceptual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Characterizing Knowledge Deficits in Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Edwards
    The Ohio State University Columbus
  • Marios Fourakis
    The Ohio State University Columbus
  • Mary E. Beckman
    The Ohio State University Columbus
  • Robert A. Fox
    The Ohio State University Columbus
  • Contact author: Jan Edwards, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, 110 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210. Email: edwards.212@osu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Characterizing Knowledge Deficits in Phonological Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 169-186. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.169
History: Received July 22, 1997 , Accepted April 10, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 169-186. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.169
History: Received July 22, 1997; Accepted April 10, 1998

To aid the development of finer-grained measures of phonological competence within a representation-based approach to phonology, two aspects of nonsymbolic phonological knowledge (knowledge of the acoustic/perceptual space and of the articulatory/production space) were examined in 6 preschool-age children with phonological disorders and 6 typically developing age peers. To evaluate perceptual knowledge, gating and noise-center tasks were used. Children with phonological disorders recognized significantly fewer words than age peers on both tasks. To evaluate production knowledge, spectral and temporal measures were obtained for CV sequences involving both lingual and labial stop consonants. Group differences on this task (such as larger transition slope values from lingual consonants to vowels for children with phonological disorders) were also observed. These differerences were interpreted as indicating that the children with phonological disorders were less able to maneuver jaw and tongue body separately or that they used "ballistic" (i.e., less controlled) gestures from lingual consonants to vowels than their age peers. These results suggest that phonological knowledge is multifaceted, and that seemingly categorical deficits at one level can be linked to less robust representations at other levels.

Acknowledgments
We thank Benjamin Munson and Nicole DeAnglelo for their assistance with data collection and Ying Xu for her assistance with data analysis. We also thank the two institutions that helped us locate the children, the parents who gave their consent, and the children who participated in the study. This work was partially supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant number DC02932).
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