Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with ADSD and compared to those of 14 women age-matched (±2 years) with no evidence of vocal pathology/dysfunction. The three acoustic parameters examined during sustained vowel production and reading included phonatory breaks, aperiodicity, and frequency shifts. Intra- and intermeasurer correlations showed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine M. Sapienza
    University of Florida Gainesville
  • Suzanne Walton
    University of Florida Gainesville
  • Thomas Murry
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Christine M. Sapienza, PhD, University of Florida, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 63 Dauer Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611. Email: sapienza@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 127-140. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.127
History: Received December 16, 1997 , Accepted September 23, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 127-140. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.127
History: Received December 16, 1997; Accepted September 23, 1998

Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with ADSD and compared to those of 14 women age-matched (±2 years) with no evidence of vocal pathology/dysfunction. The three acoustic parameters examined during sustained vowel production and reading included phonatory breaks, aperiodicity, and frequency shifts. Intra- and intermeasurer correlations showed high reliability for the measures. Findings indicated that those with ADSD produced a greater frequency of aberrant acoustic events than the controls during both tasks. For the group with ADSD, the amount and type of each event also varied with utterance type. The sustained vowel sample produced by those with ADSD consisted of a greater percentage of aperiodic segments followed by phonatory breaks and frequency shifts. During reading, frequency shifts were the predominant acoustic event, followed by phonatory breaks and aperiodicity. The advantage of segmenting the acoustic waveform into these measures and the relevancy of examining intertask performances by those with ADSD is discussed.

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