Phonatory Air Flow Characteristics of Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia and Muscle Tension Dysphonia The purpose of this study was to determine if phonatory air flow characteristics differed among women with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), and normal phonation. Phonatory air flow signals were gathered during [pα] syllable repetitions. Mean phonatory air flow, coefficients of variation, and the presence of large ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Phonatory Air Flow Characteristics of Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia and Muscle Tension Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maureen B. Higgins
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • David H. Chait
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Laura Schulte
    University of Nebraska at Omaha
  • Contact author: Maureen B. Higgins, PhD, Boys Town National Research Hospital, 555 North 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131. Email: higgins@boystown.org
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Phonatory Air Flow Characteristics of Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia and Muscle Tension Dysphonia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 101-111. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.101
History: Received March 18, 1998 , Accepted September 9, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1999, Vol. 42, 101-111. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4201.101
History: Received March 18, 1998; Accepted September 9, 1998

The purpose of this study was to determine if phonatory air flow characteristics differed among women with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), and normal phonation. Phonatory air flow signals were gathered during [pα] syllable repetitions. Mean phonatory air flow, coefficients of variation, and the presence of large air flow perturbations (75 ml/s or more) were examined for the three groups of speakers. There was no significant difference in mean phonatory air flow across groups, and very large intersubject variation in mean phonatory air flow occurred for both the AdSD and MTD groups. Coefficients of variation were similar for the groups of women with MTD and normal phonation but were significantly larger for the group with AdSD. Air flow perturbations were common with AdSD and rare with MTD. Relatively large coefficients of variation and air flow perturbations of at least 75 ml/s did occur for some women with normal voices who were 70 years of age or older. It appears that intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow may aid in the differentiation of AdSD and MTD when used in conjunction with other elements of a thorough voice evaluation. However, the potential contribution of aging to increased intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow must be considered when interpreting findings.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by research grant number R03DC01884-02 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The authors gratefully acknowledge Tom Creutz for assistance with computer programming and Tamara Field, Linda Wilson, and Daniel Young for assistance with data analysis. We also thank Susan Nittrouer, PhD, and John Saxman, PhD, who provided very helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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